Tag Archive | safari

Google Instant Search


Released this week, Google Instant is a new search mode that shows results as you type what you are looking for. This functionality is already available for Google’s domains US, UK, France, Germany, Italy, Spain and Russia.

If you’re not located in these countries, stay tuned. Google will be spreading it to the rest of the world very soon. But, even tough, you can already try it out for yourself, no matter where you are. Hit the button below and you’ll be redirected to Google’s global domain (.com). Then you’ll be able to follow this guide.

So, let’s get started. Google Instant search is only possible because of its 15 new technologies used in it. So to start using Google Instant, you’ll first need to have a decent and updated web browser like Google Chrome, Firefox, Safari or Internet Explorer. If you don’t, please update or download a new one, you’ll be doing a good thing for web developers too.

Now that you have an updated browser, go to Google.com, log in with your Google Account and you’re all set.

To know if you are really on Google Instant, you’ll notice that Google’s logo is bigger, or you can just try typing anything. As you type, the results page will automatically load, not needing to hit the “Search” button or even “Enter” from your keyboard.

In my opinion this is the best creation of the year from Google. Don’t you think? According to them, Google Instant can save 2-5 seconds per search, that’s 11 hours saved for second in the hole world!

Just in case you don’t want to change the way you search right now, you can simply turn off Google Instant in your Google Account’s Preferences page.

Feel free to leave a comment below! I’ll try to reply to all of them as soon as possible. :D

So, why use a 9-year-old browser?

Spoiled Milk IE6


The Australian Microsoft’s marketing campaign asks. Microsoft is urging those using Internet Explorer 6 to upgrade.

“You wouldn’t drink nine-year-old milk, so why use a nine-year-old browser?” asks the Web site.

“When Internet Explorer 6 was launched in 2001, it offered cutting–edge security – for the time. Since then, the Internet has evolved and the security features of Internet Explorer 6 have become outdated”, the site said.

IE6 is scorned by technophiles not just because of its security vulnerabilities but also for its nonstandard or nonexistent implementation of various Web standards. Web developers have plenty of pains supporting the diversity of browsers on the Internet, but IE6 is a particular problem given its continuing, though dwindling, widespread use.

So, if you’re still drinking this 9-year-old milk, please stop. Let’s end this nightmare. Upgrade to a newer version of IE, or try something new, better and refreshing like Google Chrome or Mozilla Firefox (both are safer, faster and customizable).

Which browsers do you use? What do you think about them? Leave a comment!

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Chrome gets more users from Microsoft’s Internet Explorer


Microsoft‘s market share in web browsers — which used to be around 90% — has now slipped below 60%, with Net Applications recording 59.95% for April. And with IE losing 0.7 percentage points over the month, Google’s Chrome browser gained almost all of it: 0.6 percentage points. Firefox and Apple‘s Safari made negligible gains, while Opera actually lost market share.

It wouldn’t be sensible to put too much emphasis on Net Applications’ monthly numbers, which are based on logging access to lots of websites. They’re a good guide to the trends, but the details depend on which sites are monitored. However, in general, Chrome has grown rapidly while other independent alternatives have tended to plateau.

ie-chrome

Compared with April last year, Chrome has gained 4.94 points of market share, while Firefox has only gained 0.75 points and Opera 0.26 points. Over the same period, IE has dropped 7.82 points, so Chrome has grabbed almost two-thirds of the share IE has lost.

Google has the huge advantage of advertising its browser on the front of its market-dominating search engine. And with HTML5, Internet Explorer tends to lose even more users to other browsers like Chrome itself, Firefox, Opera and Safari.

From Guardian.co.uk

Chrome edges out Safari in browser usage


Google’s browser has passed Safari in terms of worldwide browser usage–at least by one measurement.

NetApplications’ measurements of browser usage share, which track which browsers individuals use based on visits to the company’s network of Web sites, gave Chrome the third-place spot after No. 1 Internet Explorer and No. 2 Firefox for the week of December 6 through 12, according to a Computerworld story Tuesday. Chrome had 4.4 percent share to Safari’s 4.37 percent.

Google released beta versions of Chrome for Mac OS X and Linux on December 8. Earlier, only developer channel versions had been available. Google plans to release the “stable” versions January 12, according to the Chromium development calendar.

Take these usage share numbers with a grain of salt. Even though 0.03 percentage points still is a lot of people in the real world, it is a small fraction, and a change in Net Applications’ assumptions in August led to share changes two orders of magnitude more dramatic. Weekly statistics also vary: Although Firefox cleared 25 percent share in one week of November, it averaged only 24.72 percent for the overall month.

I’ve asked various browser makers about how trustworthy they view NetApplications’ statistics to be. The answers generally are favorable but not ringing endorsements.

Regardless of the precise details, though, the Chrome trajectory is upward: its November usage share was 3.93 percent to Safari’s 4.36 percent.

And although Google relied on word of mouth for promoting its original online search product, it’s taking a more active role with Chrome. The latest example: a “Chrome for Christmas” site that lets people send invitations to download Chrome.

Firefox proved that a browser not bundled with an operating system can be successful, and Chrome could show the idea isn’t a fluke if its growth continues.

From CNET.com

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